Which Governor is the Biggest Bully in the Senate?

Which Governor is the Biggest Bully in the Senate?

“The last time a Republican governor won re-election in Texas, we were a party of no-bully Republicans.

We didn’t even have a term for it, but there was a term: the bully in the White House.”

— Mike Huckabee, on whether the Senate will be able to overcome the “bullying” of Governor Greg Abbott, March 16, 2017, during a campaign event, Austin, Texas, US.

The Texas Republican Party has already made clear its displeasure with the way Abbott handled the state’s massive opioid crisis in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, leading to more than $1 billion in state aid to victims.

The state’s Republican Party Chair has even threatened to impeach Abbott for his handling of the crisis.

But this week, the party was back to normal.

“The bully in our White House,” Huckabee said during a speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference.

“Greg Abbott has done absolutely nothing in the last six months that has been able to get the state of Texas back on its feet.”

Abbott has defended his handling by saying he was “unable to see through the haze” and was “not responsible” for the crisis that hit Texas.

But a new Associated Press-GfK poll from March 12-15 found that Abbott has a solid lead over Democratic Lt.

Governor Dan Patrick in the race for the Senate, 51% to 44%.

Patrick, who has also criticized Abbott for not holding the governor accountable for the deadly epidemic, has the backing of all 18 Republicans in the Texas Senate.

Abbott’s position in the GOP Senate is the biggest test yet of his leadership.

It could mean a change in leadership that has so far eluded him.

If the Republican-led House passes the bill, which could happen as soon as this week on a party-line vote, the Senate could vote on a bill without Abbott, and the bill could pass with the Republican support.

It’s a sign that the state party has been growing comfortable with the possibility of having a Republican president in the next two years.

A poll from April found that Republicans are now nearly evenly split on whether they want a president who supports the party’s agenda or a president whom they see as a partisan threat.

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