Monsanto: $17.8M settlement over pesticide contamination in Missouri

Monsanto: $17.8M settlement over pesticide contamination in Missouri

Monsanto has agreed to pay $17 million to settle federal and state lawsuits accusing the chemical giant of knowingly producing toxic and carcinogenic pesticide residues in Kansas and Missouri.

The settlement will also cover $7 million in penalties levied by the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Kansas City and the Missouri Department of Health.

The agency and the EPA agreed to the settlement, which was announced Tuesday in the U-S District Court for the Western District of Missouri.

The settlement is subject to court approval.

The companies have agreed to stop using and manufacturing the Monsanto Roundup herbicide, a product that was approved in 2002.

The company has also agreed to cease marketing Roundup in the United States.

The EPA said the settlement will ensure that companies are not allowed to resume using the herbicide.

Monsanto did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The lawsuit was filed in 2013 and is still pending.

In 2016, the EPA found that Monsanto had violated the Clean Water Act by failing to disclose the chemicals in its Roundup product, the first time the agency had ever found that the chemical was being used in a way that was harmful.

The U.s.

Department of Justice also filed a complaint with the EPA alleging that Monsanto did not adequately disclose its involvement in a pesticide manufacturing plant in China that was also linked to human and animal deaths.

The agency is still investigating.

Mondelez PLC, which makes the Roundup herbicides, also settled with the government in 2017 for $7.5 million for allegedly misleading consumers about the toxicity of the herbicides.

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